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The Man Who Tried to Sell the Rob Ford Crack Tape Claims There’s a Second Tape, Featuring a Crack-Smoking Judge
Earlier this week, Mohamed Farah, a community organizer from Toronto’s Dixon neighborhood in North Etobicoke, contacted VICE Canada and offered them a tell-all interview. Farah, if his name doesn’t ring a bell, is the man who tried to broker the sale of the Rob Ford crack video to the Toronto Star and Gawker. He later appeared on CBC’s the fifth estate and again on City News in November 2013.
Our conversation with Farah led to an allegation about a second video, which supposedly features an unnamed, presumably Canadian judge smoking crack on camera. Farah claims that he and his source, the individual who filmed both videos, were more scared to break the news of the judge video than they were the Rob Ford video, because Ford was “known to be partying.”
Farah claims the same judge also offered the owner of the Rob Ford crack video help to broker a deal for the mayor’s infamous video, in exchange for keeping the judge out of the scandal.
VICE Canada reached out to the Toronto Police about allegations that they seized a video of a crack-smoking judge during the so-called Project Traveller raids. The department has yet to respond.
Farah also claims to be the man whom Rob Ford was talking about when he was videotaped intoxicated while threatening “first-degree murder” on an unknown individual—a clip the Toronto Star released last November.
We also discussed the Dixon neighborhood at length, and Farah’s own issues with the way it has been portrayed in the media. Farah has been well known in that neighborhood as a force of peace and positivity, being at the helm of various community organizations that have, among other things, been fighting to establish a community center for more than a decade.
What follows is our conversation with Mohamed Farah, which has been edited for length and clarity.
VICE: So why don’t we start at the beginning. What was it like trying to bring the crack tape to the media? And how did you feel the first time you watched it?Mohamed Farah: People in the community knew beforehand about some of the activities he’d been involved in. So I wasn’t really shocked that there was a video out there. However, when I saw the video for the first time, it really was shocking to me. Just seeing it with your own eyes, seeing how he was behaving, what he was saying, that kind of stuff.
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vicemag:

The Man Who Tried to Sell the Rob Ford Crack Tape Claims There’s a Second Tape, Featuring a Crack-Smoking Judge

Earlier this week, Mohamed Farah, a community organizer from Toronto’s Dixon neighborhood in North Etobicoke, contacted VICE Canada and offered them a tell-all interview. Farah, if his name doesn’t ring a bell, is the man who tried to broker the sale of the Rob Ford crack video to the Toronto Star and Gawker. He later appeared on CBC’s the fifth estate and again on City News in November 2013.

Our conversation with Farah led to an allegation about a second video, which supposedly features an unnamed, presumably Canadian judge smoking crack on camera. Farah claims that he and his source, the individual who filmed both videos, were more scared to break the news of the judge video than they were the Rob Ford video, because Ford was “known to be partying.”

Farah claims the same judge also offered the owner of the Rob Ford crack video help to broker a deal for the mayor’s infamous video, in exchange for keeping the judge out of the scandal.

VICE Canada reached out to the Toronto Police about allegations that they seized a video of a crack-smoking judge during the so-called Project Traveller raids. The department has yet to respond.

Farah also claims to be the man whom Rob Ford was talking about when he was videotaped intoxicated while threatening “first-degree murder” on an unknown individual—a clip the Toronto Star released last November.

We also discussed the Dixon neighborhood at length, and Farah’s own issues with the way it has been portrayed in the media. Farah has been well known in that neighborhood as a force of peace and positivity, being at the helm of various community organizations that have, among other things, been fighting to establish a community center for more than a decade.

What follows is our conversation with Mohamed Farah, which has been edited for length and clarity.

VICE: So why don’t we start at the beginning. What was it like trying to bring the crack tape to the media? And how did you feel the first time you watched it?
Mohamed Farah: People in the community knew beforehand about some of the activities he’d been involved in. So I wasn’t really shocked that there was a video out there. However, when I saw the video for the first time, it really was shocking to me. Just seeing it with your own eyes, seeing how he was behaving, what he was saying, that kind of stuff.

Continue

Reblogged from VICE